Living the WELL Life


Greens and Lettuces to Add to Your Diet

Friday, October 19, 2012

Winter Lettuces
Bibb, delicate leaves and flavor
Black Seeded Simpson, crisp, loose leaves
Deer Tongue, triangular delicate green leaves
Four Seasons, French burgundy butterhead
Freckles, burgundy freckled loose leaves
Read Oakleaf, buttery flavored loose leaves
Rouge D-Hiver, red romaine leaves that turn redder in the cold weather
Salad Bowl, sweet, loose leaf with deep lobed leaves
Tom Thumb, tiny 3-inch heads

European Greens
Arugula, peppery, delicately bitter leaves (my favorite!!!)
Chervil, fernlike leaves with the scent and essence of anise
Cress, fast growing, peppery leaves
Dandelion, tangy, chicory-flavored leaves, liver tonic
Endive, curly frisee or Belgian tubes, both with mild bitter flavor
Escarole, broad leaves with bitter flavor
Mache, heirloom leaves of hearty rosette greens with a nutty flavor
Radicchio, red chicory, with a delicate bitter flavor
Sorrel-lemon-flavored leaves
Spinach, mild flavored, loaded with iron
Swiss chard, ruffled leaves with a thick stem and colorful ribs, slightly bitter flavor


Asian Greens
Bok choy, dark leaves wrap around a thick white stem, very sweet flavor
Komatsuna, mild mustard green great for salads
Mizuna, fernlike leaves with a crisp texture and mild flavor
Red Mustard, purple leaves with mild mustard green flavor
Tatsoi, dark, glossy leaves with a mild flavor like bok choy


American Greens
Beet Tops, rich in iron, sweet flavor, great in salads and quick sautés
Collards, large leaves with a mild cabbage flavor
Kale, curly, hearty leaves with a crisp texture
Mustards, spicy bite to the leaf, best when young
Turnip Tops, flavorful in salads and stir fry dishes


And now some recipes to ‘green’ your life.

Farro Salad with Peas, Arugula and Tomatoes
If  I could eat farro every day, I would and while I cook it a number of ways, this recipe is my absolute favorite.

Makes 2 servings

1 clove fresh garlic, crushed
¼ red onion, cut into small dice
½ cup farro, rinsed well
1 cup spring or filtered water
Sea salt
½ cup fresh or frozen petite peas
8 to 10 cherry tomatoes, quartered
1 cup baby arugula, rinsed well
2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil
Generous pinch cracked black pepper
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

Place garlic, onion, farro and water in a saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat. Add a pinch of salt, cover and reduce heat to low. Cook until grain is tender and all the water has been absorbed, 25 to 30 minutes. While the farro is hot, stir in remaining ingredients and ½ teaspoon salt as the final seasoning. Transfer to a serving bowl and serve warm or at room temperature. 

Orange-Balsamic Glazed Tempeh over Greens
Tempeh is an Indonesian product made from soybeans with a lovely, nutty flavor. And because it’s fermented, it’s easy to digest. This main course is nicely flavored with a sweet tartness from the orange glaze and the greens…well, they’re the icing on the cake. 

Makes 4 servings

¼ cup frozen orange juice concentrate
¼ cup balsamic vinegar
1 tablespoon avocado oil
½ teaspoon soy sauce
2 cloves fresh garlic, crushed
1 tablespoon finely minced fresh basil
1 teaspoon finely minced fresh flat-leaf parsley
24 ounces tempeh, cut into 4 (6-ounce) slices
2 bunches kale or collards, rinsed well, stems trimmed, left whole
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

Combine orange juice concentrate, vinegar, oil, soy sauce, garlic, basil and parsley in a skillet over medium heat. When the mixture is hot, arrange tempeh slices in the mixture and cook until browned, about 4 minutes. Turn and brown on the other side, about 4 minutes more. 

While the tempeh braises, place about ½ inch water and a pinch of salt in the bottom of a saucepan and bring to a boil. Add greens and steam until they are just wilted and bright green, about 3 minutes. Drain well and slice into bite-size pieces. Arrange greens on a platter. Arrange tempeh slices on top of greens and sprinkle with lemon juice. Serve hot. 

Lentils with Greens
Simple, elegant and earthy, this lentil stew is warming and comforting on the coldest of winter days. It’s easy to make, loaded with nutrients and the greens add a freshness that prevents the stew getting heavy.

Makes 4 to 5 servings

2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 cloves fresh garlic, crushed
1 red onion, cut into small dice
Sea salt
2 stalks celery, cut into small dice
1 medium carrot, cut into small dice
1 roasted red bell pepper, cut into small dice
1 cup green or brown lentils, rinsed well
3 cups spring or filtered water
1 bay leaf
1 small bunch escarole, rinsed very well, hand shredded into bite-size pieces

Place oil, garlic and onion in a deep skillet over medium heat. When the onion begins to sizzle, add a pinch of salt and sauté until translucent, about 3 minutes. Stir in celery and a pinch of salt and sauté for 1 minute. Stir in carrot and a pinch of salt and sauté for 1 minute. Stir in bell pepper and a pinch of salt and sauté for 1 minute. Add lentils, water and bay leaf and bring to a boil. Cover and reduce heat to low. Cook until lentils are soft and all the water has been absorbed, about 45 minutes. Season with 1 teaspoon salt; stir in escarole and cook, covered, until escarole is tender and wilted, about 4 minutes. Stir well to combine and transfer to a serving bowl.


Braised Endive and Pear Slices with Lemon
I love this side dish in cooler weather. The delicate bitter flavor of the endive is nicely balanced by the sweet succulence of pears and the entire dish comes to life with a touch of lemon flavor.

Makes 4 servings

2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar
1 teaspoon sea salt
4 Belgian endive, bottom trimmed, halved
2 ripe, but firm pears, (Bosc or red are best)
2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice

Heat oil, vinegar and salt in a flat-bottomed skillet over medium heat. Lay endive, cut sides down, in the pan. Cover; reduce heat to medium-low and cook until the endive wilts and the cut sides brown, about 20 minutes. When the endive is about 80 percent cooked, halve pears and cut each half lengthwise into thin slices. Lay pears on top of endive, cover and cook for 5 minutes more. Remove from heat, arrange endive halves, cut sides up, with pears laced through the dish. Drizzle with lemon juice. Serve hot. 

Stir-Fried Bok Choy with Ginger and Garlic
If cooking intimidates you, then this is the dish for you. Easy to make, delicious and loaded with nutrition, this side dish will win you raves every time and no one will realize it’s good for them.

Makes 5 to 6 servings

1 tablespoon avocado oil
4 cloves fresh garlic, crushed
1-inch piece fresh ginger, cut into fine julienne pieces
Scant pinch crushed red pepper flakes
Soy sauce
½ red onion, cut into thin half-moon slices
1 cup fine julienne pieces fresh daikon
5 baby bok choy, quartered lengthwise, rinsed free of dirt
2 teaspoons black sesame seeds, lightly pan-toasted

Heat oil in a wok or large skillet over medium heat. Add garlic, ginger, red pepper flakes and a splash of soy sauce and stir-fry for 1 minute. Stir in red onion and a splash of soy sauce and stir-fry for 2 minutes. Stir in daikon and a splash of soy sauce and stir-fry for 1 minute. Stir in bok choy and 1 teaspoon soy sauce and stir-fry until wilted, but bright green in color. (Add a small amount of water if the vegetables start to stick, but if you stir constantly, you should not need this.)

To serve, arrange vegetables on a platter and sprinkle with sesame seeds. 

Garlicky Collard Greens
If you love garlic, then this side dish will become a favorite pretty quickly. Its strong flavor and simplicity is perfection. 

Makes 5 to 6 servings

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
6 cloves fresh garlic, crushed
1 medium yellow onion, halved lengthwise, cut into thin half-moon slices
Sea salt
2 roasted red bell peppers, sliced into ribbons
1 medium bunch collard greens, stem tips trimmed, left whole

Place oil, garlic and onion in a large skillet over medium heat. When the onion begins to sizzle, add a pinch of salt and sauté until translucent, about 3 minutes. Stir in bell peppers and a pinch of salt and sauté for 1 minute. Just before adding them to the skillet, slice collard greens into bite-size pieces. Stir into skillet, season with 2/3 teaspoon salt and sauté until wilted and a bright green color, 4 to 6 minutes. Transfer to a serving platter and serve immediately. 


Bitter Greens Salad with Walnut-Shallot Vinaigrette
This is my favorite winter salad. The mix of bitter greens is hearty but light enough to be refreshing and the dressing is rich enough to make it feel special, even for a weekday supper.

Makes 5 to 6 servings

Walnut-Shallot Vinaigrette
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon walnut oil
1 teaspoon brown rice syrup
1 shallot, very finely minced
1 clove fresh garlic, very finely minced
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
2/3 teaspoon sea salt
Generous pinch cracked black pepper


Bitter Greens Salad

2 Belgian endive, halved lengthwise, sliced into long ribbons
2 cups hand-shredded escarole
2 cups baby arugula
1 cup hand-shredded watercress
1 cup finely shredded radicchio
½ cup coarsely chopped walnuts, lightly pan toasted (optional)

Prepare vinaigrette: Whisk together ingredients in a small bowl until emulsified. Set aside for flavors to develop.

Make salad: Combine all salad ingredients, except walnuts, in a large bowl. Toss gently with dressing to coat the leaves. Serve immediately with walnuts on the side for those who want a bit of crunch with their salad. 


Sautéed Escarole with Fresh Herbs and Pomegranates
I first made this dish for a holiday dinner and it was such a hit that I found myself making it every chance I could. You will, too. 

Makes 3 to 4 servings

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
3 cloves fresh garlic, crushed
1 medium red onion, halved lengthwise, cut into very thin half-moon slices
Sea salt
2 stalks celery, thinly sliced on the diagonal
1 medium head escarole, washed very well
Scant pinch ground nutmeg
Seeds from ½ pomegranate (see Note below)

Place oil, garlic and onion in a skillet over medium heat. When the onion begins to sizzle, add a pinch of salt and sauté until translucent, about 3 minutes. Stir in celery and a pinch of salt and sauté for 1 minute. Hand-shred escarole leaves into bite-size pieces and stir into skillet. Season with 2/3 teaspoon salt and nutmeg and sauté until just wilted, 3 to 5 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in pomegranate seeds. Serve immediately. 

NOTE: To remove the seeds (actually seed sacs called arils) from a pomegranate, cut a cross in the top of the pomegranate with a sharp knife. Pull the pomegranate into quarters. Submerge the pomegranate in a bowl of cold water. This prevents the pomegranate from staining your fingers. Separate the light-colored membranes and the seeds. The membranes will float and the seeds will sink.


Frisée, Escarole and Dulse Salad with Ginger-Wasabi Vinaigrette 
This uniquely flavored salad really packs a punch with hot, spicy wasabi and mineral-rich dulse. Not to mention the nutrition in this baby, from magnesium and potassium to calcium and iron. Easy to make…to be big and strong.

Makes 4 to 5 servings

Ginger-Wasabi Vinaigrette
1 tablespoon soy sauce
¼ cup fresh lime juice
1 teaspoon brown rice syrup
2 teaspoons wasabi powder, mixed with just enough water to make a thick paste (see Note below)
2 teaspoons fresh ginger juice
1 tablespoon avocado oil
1 teaspoon sesame oil
2 teaspoons pure flax oil
3 to 4 scallions, finely minced


Frisée, Escarole and Dulse Salad
2 cups hand-shredded frisée (also known as curly endive)
2 cups hand-shredded escarole
1 cup finely-shredded radicchio
1 small cucumber, cut into fine julienne pieces
½ cup dulse fronds, sorted and finely shredded
¼ cup coarsely chopped walnuts, pan-toasted 

Make vinaigrette. Whisk together ingredients in a small bowl until emulsified. Set aside for flavors to develop while making the salad.

Prepare salad: Combine all ingredients, except walnuts, in a large bowl. Toss gently with dressing to coat the leaves. Transfer to a serving platter and sprinkle with walnuts. 

NOTE: To boost the heat in wasabi, mix it with water to create a paste. Place it on a glass saucer and turn a glass or china cup over it to cover. Allow to stand under the glass for 10 minutes. The longer it remains under the glass, the more the heat develops.

 



Bookmark and Share


Meet Our Bloggers


            
          
          
          
          
          






RSS